Friday Programme

Location
The Friday Programme is being hosted by Dundee College - please check the Location page for details on how to travel to the venue.

Click on the presentation titles for more information about each individual session. This page is being updated over the week, so please check back for announcements.

09:15 Arrival and Registration (refreshments available)
10:00 Introduction
Sarah Price, Manager, JISC Regional Support Centre Scotland North & East
10:10 Keynote: Can We Afford to Use Games, Simulations, and Virtual Worlds in Education?
Daniel Livingstone, University of the West of Scotland
10:40 Keynote: Is There Really a Place for Fun and Games in Adult Learning?
Nicola Whitton, Manchester Metropolitan University
11:10 Refreshments
11:30 AM Parallel Sessions
Seminar 1 a. Tools of the Trade
Jenny Kellie, Director, Learn Direct & Build
Jackie Mullen, Andrew Shaw, Learn Direct & Build

b. Levelling the Playing Field?
Craig Mill, e-Learning Advisor, JISC Regional Support Centre Scotland North & East
Seminar 2 a. Learning Beyond the Classroom: Games Design and Artists Not in Residence
Greg Hodgson, Chalfonts Community College
b. Universe Quest: Game Development as a Vehicle for Engagement
Andy Macpherson, Managing Director, Learn TPM/Learnit3D Ltd.
Seminar 3 a. Introducing SQA GamesSpace - BETT Award Winner 2011
Veronica Harris, Project Manager, SQA
Linn van der Zanden, Learning Technologist, SQA

b. Emotional and Motivational Aspects of Educational Play
Jonathan Sykes, eMotionLab, Glasgow Caledonian University
Workshop 1 Development and Evaluation of a Game to Teach Requirements Collection and Analysis at Tertiary Education Level
Thomas Hainey, University of the West of Scotland
Workshop 2 3D Games Development for Free
Colin Maxwell, Carnegie College
Hands-on Mix Featuring examples from ‘Music & Games’, ‘Roma Nova’ and ‘Adaptive Gaming…’
Gianna Cassidy, Glasgow Caledonian University
Dr Panagiotis Petridis, Serious Games Institute, Coventry University
Andrew Hall, CEO, Crocodile Clips Ltd.
Curt Finnemore, Maths Teacher, James Gillespie’s High School, Edinburgh
12:30 Wander and Learn - Exhibitors
13:00 Lunch
14:00 Keynote: Persist or Die! Learning in World of Warcraft
Michelle Hoyle, School of Informatics, University of Sussex
14:30 Keynote: Learning Games, Games to Learn, Serious Games, Hard Fun, etc., etc.
Tom Hodgkinson, Senior Content Producer, BBC Scotland
15:10 PM Parallel Sessions
Seminar 1 a. Roma Nova: A Framework for Exploratory Learning with Characters in Virtual Environments
Dr Panagiotis Petridis, Serious Games Institute, Coventry University
b. Music and Games for Health and Wellbeing
Dr Gianna Cassidy, Music Psychologist, Glasgow Caledonian University
Seminar 2 a. Creation, Not Consumption
Charlie Love, Development Officer, LTS Consolarium
b. Virtual Patients in a Games-based Model: Tackling Health Inequalities in Scotland
Dr Jenni Harrison, NHS Education for Scotland (NES)
Seminar 3 a. Jute, Jam and Joysticks
Andrew MacKenzie, Project Manager for Creative Industries, Dundee College
Dan Buksh, Lecturer, Dundee College

b. Adaptive Gaming: Sumdog’s Attack on Elitism
Andrew Hall, CEO, Crocodile Clips Ltd
Curt Finnemore, Maths Teacher, James Gillespie’s High School, Edinburgh
Workshop 1 Virtual Stock Market Trading, an Essential Part of the Learning Process?
Paul Blumenfeld, University of Strathclyde Business School
Workshop 2 “Try not to have a good time … This is supposed to be educational.” - Charles Schulz
Helen Adam, Adult Literacies Tutor, Fife Council
Stephanie O’Donnell, Adult Literacies Tutor, Fife Council
Hands-on Mix Featuring examples from ‘Tools of the Trade’, ‘Levelling the Playing Field’ and ‘GamesSpace’
Jackie Mullen and Andrew Shaw, Learn Direct & Build
Craig Mill, e-Learning Advisor, JISC Regional Support Centre Scotland North & East
Veronica Harris, Project Manager & Linn van der Zanden, Learning Technologist, SQA
16:15 Closing - Evaluation & Prizes
16:30 End

Keynotes

Can We Afford to Use Games, Simulations, and Virtual Worlds in Education?

Daniel Livingstone, University of the West of Scotland

Computer games, simulations and virtual worlds have made significant inroads into education and training. This is driven by a desire to improve engagement or to immerse learning in realistic simulated settings, but often limited by economics and resources. How much does it really cost to use games in education, and how can we maximise the gains while minimising the cost?

Open Education initiatives hint at solutions, but there are some particular challenges in opening access to virtual world, game and simulation educational resources, and in integrating learning and assessment from these into existing systems and practices.

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Is There Really a Place for Fun and Games in Adult Learning?

Nicola Whitton, Manchester Metropolitan University

Games have the power to engage and motivate learners by providing rich, experiential learning environments. In Higher and Further Education, however, there is increasing pressure for institutions to provide ‘value for money’ learning experiences, and students take their increasingly expensive educations very seriously. This raises the question of whether games – even serious ones – are appropriate or acceptable in our universities and colleges.

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Persist or Die! Learning in World of Warcraft

Michelle Hoyle, School of Informatics, University of Sussex

“All you need to understand is everything you know is wrong.” —Weird Al

My mother told me cleaning toilets builds character if done repeatedly. The other night five friends spent more than three hours dying over and over again while playing World of Warcraft (WoW). She never said anything about dying. I found cleaning toilets only gets you clean toilets. Dying and playing, however, teaches you important things. Demons, dragons, dwarves, and possibly folklore, you could see, but learning, love, and leadership?

Sounds crazy, but it’s true: World of Warcraft has something to say about learning. Prepare yourself, because everything you thought you knew is wrong.

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Learning Games, Games to Learn, Serious Games, Hard Fun, etc., etc.

Tom Hodgkinson, Senior Content Producer, BBC Scotland

Tom joined BBC Scotland in 1999 as an Online Researcher working on its games website for children. He has remained with the organisation ever since, dividing his work between programming brand support (including BBC Two’s Restoration and, latterly, the multiplatform projects Cycling the Americas, Scotland’s History and Scotland’s Landscape) and application development (including the BBC’s internal blogging platform, automation of television & radio programme support and content templating infrastructure).

More recently, his attention as Senior Producer has been directed towards planning, strategy and commissioning as the BBC’s priorities across both existing and emerging platforms rapidly evolve.

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Seminars

Tools of the Trade

Jenny Kellie, Director, Learn Direct & Build (left)
Jackie Mullen (right), Andrew Shaw, Learn Direct & Build

Taking inspiration from popular TV quiz shows, Learn Direct & Build have developed four games featuring the irrepressible Ricky Winchester as the host. These resources are freely available to Scottish colleges and are pre-populated with banks of questions for a range of trades and can be used directly from a website or institutional learning management system.

However, the games are not limited to one curricular area - tutors can download an editor that lets them create their own questions and drop in rich media assets such as video clips. Come along to this presentation to learn how the games have been used with students and discover how you apply these resources you to your own teaching area.

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Levelling the Playing Field?

Craig Mill, e-Learning Advisor, JISC Regional Support Centre Scotland North & East

With all the interest in gaming, a critical question remains - will the shift to a more games-based learning approach mean that an important cohort be excluded? In this session Craig will explore the barriers and opportunities that disabled learners  may encounter when playing games.

In some cases a learner may require to use alternative assistive technologies such as magnification, a screen reader, voice control or even a single switch (button) to access on-screen content. Using real life examples, Craig will demonstrate the issues that can impact on learners with additional support needs.

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Learning Beyond the Classroom: Games Design and Artists Not in Residence

Greg Hodgson, Chalfonts Community College

Student voice started to demand time to play games in school. Unconvinced, we offered to teach games theory, but struggled to squeeze it into a packed curriculum. A chance encounter led to a collaboration between Chicago and London where students tune in to gaming professionals and experts from around the world from the comfort of their homes.

Greg Hodgson’s verdict is: “Having played with various forms of online learning, video-conferencing, and web tools to enhance and engage learning at The Chalfonts Community College over the last five years, the Games Design Workshop has to be the most significant and exciting educational project I have been involved with. The ‘artist not in residence’ is now a tried and tested format that is not only economic but delivers world-class expertise directly into the students’ hands.”

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Universe Quest: Game Development as a Vehicle for Engagement

Andy Macpherson, Managing Director, Learn TPM/Learnit3D Ltd.

Working with 50 mostly minority young women in Oakland California, the Universe Quest (UQ) project aims to enable newly-recruited participants to learn how to gain confidence in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathemaics (STEM) skills and careers using STEM.

UQ participants are engaged in working with professionals from the University of California, Berkeley, developers from Learnit3D and the Girl Scouts of Northern California. UQ is an after-school program, consisting of 2-hour workshops, along with monthly field trips and frequent video conferences with IT Company partners. The girls on the program are working to create a UQ, participant-developed, internet game as the primary medium for sharing outcomes and recruiting future participants.

Find out more about Universe Quest here.

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Introducing SQA GamesSpace - BETT Award Winner 2011

Veronica Harris, Project Manager, SQA (left)
Linn van der Zanden, Learning Technologist, SQA (right)

The Scottish Qualifications Authority received a grant from the European Social Fund in 2007 to invest in the creation of innovative assessments for candidates on Skills for Work (SfW) courses. SfW courses are vocational in nature and aimed at the 14 – 18 year age group.

In 2008, SQA began looking into the possiblity of creating games for assessing candidates, in place of the more traditional, paper-based qualifications. A number of software solutions were trialled and the one found to meet SQA’s needs most accurately was Thinking Worlds™ produced by Caspian Learning. SQA went on to engage the services of a Newcastle based educational technology, projects and management company, LearnTPM Ltd, to customise the software.

This presentation will set out the journey from concept to delivery of robust games for main diet assessment; the difficulties that presented themselves and the way in which both organisations overcame them.

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Emotional and Motivational Aspects of Educational Play

Jonathan Sykes, eMotionLab, Glasgow Caledonian University

Emotion pervades our lives and shapes all human experience. Emotion impacts our encoding of experience, motivates us into action, and dominates social interaction.

This presentation offers a basic introduction to theories of emotion and motivation, and demonstrates how game designers might utilise our current understanding of affect to develop emotionally rich play experiences.

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Roma Nova: A Framework for Exploratory Learning with Characters in Virtual Environments

Dr Panagiotis Petridis, Serious Games Institute, Coventry University

Roma Nova is a serious game which enables exploratory learning by immersing learners/players inside a virtual environment where they learn different aspects of history through their interactions with a crowd of virtual, yet authentic, Roman characters. The Roma Nova project’s aim is to teach history to 11-to-14 year-olds, which corresponds to Key Stage 3 (KS3) of the English curriculum. However, the environment could be used in a variety of ways and with different levels.

This presentation will demonstrate a first implementation of the concept, showing in practice how the Levels of Interaction are likely to foster more natural interactions between the player and the non-playing characters.

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Music and Games for Health and Wellbeing

Dr Gianna Cassidy, Music Psychologist, Glasgow Caledonian University

This talk presents current findings from music and games for health and wellbeing. Focusing on educational potential, it is asserted that music games provide a valuable vehicle to connect formal and informal music-making, authenticating participation to the wider musical world of the learner. The power of music participation to enrich cognitive, social and emotional wellbeing has long been supported by an established body of work (e.g., Hargreaves & North, 2008; Juslin & Sloboda, 2001; Miell et al, 2005; MacDonald, et al., 2002).

The digital revolution is creating new ways to engage with music, transforming music-making opportunities in the classroom and wider musical environment (e.g., North & Hargreaves, 2008). While learners are increasingly engaged with music outside the classroom, evidence indicates learners are increasingly disengaged with formal music education (e.g., Abril & Gault, 2008; Dillon, 2005; Lamont & Maton, 2008). The challenge for music educators is to capitalise on the evident motivation for informal music-making with digital technology, as a tool to create new opportunities to inspire and engage learners with music in educational contexts (see Hargreaves et al, 2001).

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Creation, Not Consumption

Charlie Love, Development Officer, LTS Consolarium

Charlie Love will share the work that the LTS Consolarium have been leading on in relation to building capacity within schools to help nurture and grow a culture of creation and not just consumption of digital content.

He will discuss the position of games design within Curriculum for Excellence and in so doing will share his experiences in leading computer game design in Scottish schools and developing creativity and programming skills in learners. He will also discuss work with a variety of partners including SQA and Scotland’s Colleges.

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Virtual Patients in a Games-based Model: Tackling Health Inequalities in Scotland

Dr Jenni Harrison, NHS Education for Scotland (NES)

Tackling health inequalities is complex; contributing lifestyle factors such as poor diet and access barriers to care can be problematic. Consequently NES is creating bespoke photo-realistic virtual patients in a games based model to support healthcare practitioners develop capacity and capability helping staff tackle health inequalities issues when they present in NHS Scotland.

This presentation (and demonstration) will provide an overview of the NES Virtual Patient project including:

  • motivations and challenges for tackling health inequalities
  • why a games-based model is being used for content delivery to learners
  • how evidence of emotional / social considerations which support effective patient care and interventions will be included
  • expected student behaviour change following learning
  • projection (generalisability) of this learning model for related disciplines

On completion of the package healthcare staff will be able to interact in real time with a high quality (situated healthcare) game, informed by genuine (anonymised) patient information. This project is being developed by NES in collaboration with the Digital Design Studio (DDS), Universities of Glasgow and Dundee and the Scottish Dental Clinical Effectiveness Programme (SDCEP).

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Jute, Jam and Joysticks

Andrew MacKenzie, Project Manager for Creative Industries, Dundee College (left)
Dan Buksh, Lecturer, Dundee College (right)

This presentation explains how Dundee College devised, developed and ran the International App Conference and AppJam that was held in November of last year. A special focus will be on the role of the AppJam as a tool for learning.

The AppJam was a 48-hour non-stop challenge for 13 teams of specially selected individuals, working collaboratively in small, international teams who were given the task of creating an outstanding app entirely within the time allowed. The environment and dynamics of the event created a real air of creativity and the learning was supported by industry experts as well as high levels of peer to peer support.

The results were judged by a panel of leading industry professionals and the teams presented their developments to the conference delegates on the final day. More information on the event can found at www.appjam.eu. Dan Bushek, one of the participants in the competition, will present his perspective of the event, which is two-fold, as he is also a lecturer at the college.

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Adaptive Gaming: Sumdog’s Attack on Elitism

Andrew Hall, CEO, Crocodile Clips Ltd (left)
Curt Finnemore, Maths Teacher, James Gillespie’s High School, Edinburgh (right)

Balancing engagement and education can be the most difficult aspect of games-based learning.  In this session, the creators of the popular Sumdog numeracy website describe their novel approach. Sumdog’s free maths games offer a key innovation: the gameplay is independent of the educational content. Any game can be used to practise any topic, and - given that most are multiplayer - students can study different topics while competing in the same game.

Introducing this separation into games-based learning isn’t straightforward, but the results can be spectacular.  It means that students with widely varying abilities can play each other happily at the same game. As a result, many teachers are already using Sumdog’s games to personalise learning across groups with widely differing abilities.  In addition, student engagement is maximised: they are free to play as they wish, while their teachers retain complete control over their learning.

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Workshops

Development and Evaluation of a Game to Teach Requirements Collection and Analysis at Tertiary Education Level

Thomas Hainey, University of the West of Scotland

This study evaluated the effectiveness of a particular application of games-based learning in software engineering education particularly from a pedagogical perspective. The study was conducted at both Further Education (FE) and Higher Education (HE) to ascertain if a games-based learning alternative is more suitable than traditional approaches at these levels.

The game was compared to paper-based and role-play approaches to assess whether a game could potentially improve on some of the shortcomings of traditional approaches. Delegates will have the opportunity to try the game out for themselves during the workshop.

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3D Games Development for Free

Colin Maxwell, Carnegie College

Learn to create a 3D game using Blender, the free 3D modelling and animation tool. The session will look at using Blender in the context of teaching units in the NPA Computer Games Development qualification. Delegates will be lead through the creation of a 3D game, from the initial design to a working prototype.

The NPA Computer Games Development is a new qualification from the SQA at SCQF levels 4, 5 and 6. Comprised of three units the NPA covers the design and development of computer games and the creation of graphics, sounds and animation for games.

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Virtual Stock Market Trading, an Essential Part of the Learning Process?

Paul Blumenfeld, University of Strathclyde Business School*

In order to recreate real emotions and stresses that can occur in the investment banking industry, pratical experience over theorical learning is invaluable to recruiters. Furthermore, the skills gained during the process can be extrapolated and applied in any type of employment or even life in general.

This workshop will put you in the shoes of a London Stock Market trader, and will give hands-on experience of using a virtual trading web platform. A better understanding of how these tools work, and why they are important as part of the learning process in a finance academic curriculum will be presented in a fun and intuitive way.

* Paul is a second-year student studying for his BA Hons. Finance and Business Technology, who has used a virtual stockmarket game as part of his studies.

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“Try not to have a good time … This is supposed to be educational.” - Charles Schulz

Helen Adam, Adult Literacies Tutor, Fife Council (left)
Stephanie O’Donnell, Adult Literacies Tutor, Fife Council (right)

In this hands-on workshop, we’ll demonstrate how to use gaming technology to engage with hard to reach young learners and improve literacy and numeracy skills.

Making Games in Schools is a creative cross-curricular approach to designing and making computer games which embraces the new technologies requirements of A Curriculum for Excellence.  Adventure Author software was developed by Dr Judy Robertson and her team at Heriot-Watt University and combines with the commercially available Neverwinter Nights 2 fantasy role play game.

Using a 3D multimodal animated environment, create your own game world, complete with dialogue, action and consequence.  This process, encompasses a wide range of learning opportunities, including problem solving, logical thinking and storytelling.

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